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Are You Using the Wikipedia Factor?

I love Wikipedia for a lot of reasons, but especially for the reason I want to share with you today. I call it the Wikipedia Factor, and, as a content creator, you’re going to love this one.

If you picked up my brand-new report, “Public Domain Children’s Books: A Complete Waste of Time or Absolute Goldmine,” then chances are you may have been inspired to give children’s books another look. Well, today, I want to help your efforts even more by sharing a little trick I use that centers around Wikipedia.org.

When creating products, you obviously need the content for the product itself, but you also need salescopy, cover images, support images, etc. The same is true when working with Children’s Books. I’ve found that Wikipedia offers excellent references to many of the classic Children’s books (not to mention other books as well). And here’s the fun part. The Wikipedia entries often include vintage cover images, interior illustrations, a story synopsis, an author biography and more! And the best part is that many of these items are often Public Domain!

Let me give you some examples. If you follow the link below, you’ll be taken to a Wikipedia page that features a list of Children’s classic books. Here is the link:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_children%27s_classic_books

You’ll notice that every book title is clickable. Pick one and you’ll see what I mean about the possibilities. This is the exact method I used with the Beowulf audio and e-book project I shared with you a little while back. Oh, and just because
you do not see the book you’re interested in on the list doesn’t mean it isn’t on Wikipedia. Do a search for the title or the author.

Another benefit (and little secret of mine)… If you search for authors, chances are likely that, in their Wikipedia entry, there will also be links to sources that offer digital versions of their books from the Public Domain (if the book
exists online and if it’s in the Public Domain).

And so…armed with this new information AND a copy of my new report, you should be set to have a lot of fun with Children’s books. And if you haven’t picked up the new report on Public Domain Children’s Books yet, you can do so here:

http://www.tonysyardsale.com

BTW…just because I used Children’s literature as the example for this article doesn’t mean you are limited to using Wikipedia for just literature…wink.

To your continued Public Domain success!

Tony

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