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Posts Tagged ‘copyright’

The New Public Domain Mark

Creative Commons announced the release of its Public Domain Mark, a tool that enables works free of known copyright restrictions to be labeled in a way that allows them to be easily discovered over the Internet. The Public Domain Mark, to be used for marking works already free of copyright, complements Creative Commons’ CC0 public domain dedication, which enables authors to relinquish their rights prior to the expiration of copyright.

This is great news for those of us who use Public Domain-based content for product creation. The new Public Domain Mark will give us the ability to target keyword searches to find Public Domain content easier and faster than ever before! To learn more about the Creative Commons’ Public Domain Tools, click HERE!

Europeana—Europe’s digital library, museum and archive—is the first major adopter of the Public Domain Mark. Europeana estimates that by mid-2011, the Public Domain Mark will be used in connection with millions of out-of-copyright works made available through its portal. With the adoption of this new standard at the highest levels of content preservation, it is likely that most other major content holders will adopt the standard as well. Which is GREAT news for us!

Today, Creative Commons announces the release of its Public Domain Mark, a tool that enables works free of known copyright restrictions to be labeled in a way that allows them to be easily discovered over the Internet. The Public Domain Mark, to be used for marking works already free of copyright, complements Creative Commons’ CC0 public domain dedication, which enables authors to relinquish their rights prior to the expiration of copyright.

“The Public Domain Mark is a further step on the path towards making the promise of a digital public domain a reality,” said Michael Carroll, a founding board member of Creative Commons and a law professor at American University.

Europeana—Europe’s digital library, museum and archive—is the first major adopter of the Public Domain Mark. Europeana estimates that by mid-2011, the Public Domain Mark will be used in connection with millions of out-of-copyright works made available through its portal.

“An important part of our mandate is to ensure that digitized works made available through Europeana are properly labeled with rights information, including when a work is free of known copyright restrictions so that teachers, students and others can freely use it in their work, changing it and remixing it as they wish,” noted Jill Cousins, Executive Director of Europeana.

The Public Domain Mark in its current form is intended for use with works that are free of known copyright around the world, primarily old works that are beyond the reach of copyright in all jurisdictions. We have already started mapping the next phases of our public domain work, which will look at ways to identify and mark works that are in the public domain in a limited number of countries.

The UK’s Open Government License

Public Domain content in the United Kingdom recently took a huge step forward with the release of the Open Government License by the UK Government Licensing Framework (UKGLF). The Open Government Licence (OGL) is a simple set of terms and conditions to enable the free re-use of government and public sector information.

“The OGL covers information where the relevant rights owner, or Information Provider which has authority to license the Information for use, make it expressly available for use under the terms of the OGL. This can be achieved by a clear statement in the information being licensed, or in a position which relates to the information, or by means of a hyperlink.

The OGL can cover:

  • non-personal information and works which are subject to copyright and database right (much of this information will be accessible on public sector web sites or already published by the public sector)
  • previously unpublished datasets released by the public sector; and
  • source code and software originating from public sector bodies.

Much of this information will be accessible on public sector web sites, online portals or printed publications.” (excerpted from HERE)

When a UK “work” is licensed under the OGL, the Licensor grants you a worldwide, royalty-free, perpetual, non-exclusive licence to use the Information subject to the conditions below.

You are free to:

  • copy, publish, distribute and transmit the Infomation;
  • adapt the Information;
  • exploit the Information commercially for example, by combining it with other Information, or by including it in your own product or application.

There is also attribution required as a part of the license, very similar to a Creative Commons license.

The OGL opens up a LOT of amazing content for use in product creation and more (you saw point #3, right?). One example of the wealth of content available under this license is the National Archives in the UK, which contains a massive treasure trove of documents, images and more. Make sure you spend some time reading this exciting new license in its entirety, then prepare to embark on a treasure hunt of UK proportions!

PDX-TV Episode 3: Make Money from Parts Manuals?

In this latest episode, I share a new insight for using catalogs and parts manuals from the Public Domain. I’m also freezing my butt off!

[veoh]http://www.veoh.com/browse/videos/category/educational_and_howto/watch/v19689077WqZrPAx8[/veoh]

Book Sale Survival Guide

www.publicdomainblog.com

Spring and Summer are favorite times of the year for me on a number of levels. I prefer a warm breeze over snow, flowers over snow, yard sales over snow…I think you get the picture. This time of the year also brings with it something else I love…book sales! One of my favorite annual sales happens next weekend…I’m excited!

When you consider that there is a minimum of 85 million books in the Public Domain and only 4 million of those are available online, it makes events like a good book sale seem like a magical treasure hunt for content…or maybe it’s just me :-)

The best way to find out what book sales are happening in your area is to use the same website I use: Book Sale Finder (http://www.booksalefinder.com). It’s not the most beautiful website in the world, but they deliver the information you want…where is the next sale? Simply click on your state and check the listings.

Something you may also want to consider, especially if you travel a lot, is to check listings for the area you’re travelling to. You never know what book adventure may await!

When checking the listings on Book Sale Finder, you will find that there are a number of different types of listings with regard to what is being offered at the sales. What you want to pay attention to are the sales that feature 100% donated books that are NOT picked over. I’ll use the listing for the local sale I’m attending as the perfect example for what I mean. Here is the listing:

50,000 books; 100% donated; 65% hardcover; sorted; not ‘picked over'; no buyer restrictions; plus maps, sheet music, A/V; paperback .50; hardcovers up to $15

There are several key points to note here…

  1. The quantity listed (more is better)
  2. 100% donated (provides greater opportunity for “goodies”)
  3. 65% hardcover (most older books in the Public Domain are hardcover)
  4. Sorted (makes it MUCH easier to find what you are searching for quickly)
  5. Not picked over (increases your chances for finding books of value, content-wise)
  6. No buyer restrictions (means you can buy as much as you want…a good thing)
  7. Other offerings and prices (always good to know).

Here are a few more “Book Sale Survival Guide” tips:

Take a bag, cart or box. You will want something to put your books in…trust me, if you start finding a lot of books, this will make your life easier.

Grab now, sort later. The name of the game is to grab ANY book that looks like it could have potential for you. Delaying could result in you NOT ending up with the book. You can always sort later before you pay.

Check Copyrights on the spot. If you think you’ve found a gem, you can check its copyright right on the spot by using your iPhone or Blackberry. Log into the Standford University site (for books 1923 – 1950) or the Copyright.gov site (for books 1950 – 1964) and conduct a search. It could save you some time and money!

Book Dealers. They’ll be there, so be aware. They are easy to spot. You’ll usually see the scanning books with a barcode reader to check the “sell” value of books. What’s funny about that is that they’re hoping to find cheap books that they can, in turn, sell for a profit. Spend $1.00 and sell for $20.00. Of course, our approach is MUCH different. Spend $1.00 and make $1,000’s be creating new products. But again, be aware that some of the books you are after, they are too…but not all!

Stay focused! Whenever you are faced with sorting through 50,000 books, it’s really easy to become distracted. Go to the sale with specific niche topics in mind and search for those books first. After you’ve explored those topics THEN look around for other possibilities. This is super important! Lots of people in a room with lots of books can challenge the best book junkies, so go with a plan. Consider even writing a list of specific authors or titles so you don’t forget to check for them in the flurry of excitement.

Book Sales are a LOT of fun, but don’t plan to attend thinking only a few people will be there. If it’s a big sale, plan to go early…there WILL be a line! Just remember to have fun…enjoy yourself…and look forward to finding those “hidden gems!”

Pay Attention to This…

There is a secret research strategy for finding top quality Public Domain books that I’ve been using for a while now. I’ve hinted at it in the past once or twice, but never, until now, have I come right out and told you, “pay attention to this…and do it!” All that changes today, because once again…today…this strategy has proven itself once again.

There are lots of methods you can use to find Public Domain books…online, at used bookstores, flea markets, the library, etc., but the one I’m going to share shortly has become my method of choice because it has consistently proven itslef to be the quickest way to identify the best niche-related books in the Public Domain. As with any method, it is not a be-all-end-all strategy…and it requires some work…but it certainly builds off my now-famous saying, “You can’t find what you don’t know to look for!” Today, knowing what to look for is about to get MUCH easier because of what I’m going to share. Here goes.

When I first began researching magazines in the Public Domain several months back, I noticed that most magazines advertised books related to the niche the magazine addressed. The same is true today. Nothing earth-shaking there. But then I also noticed that many of the publishing companies who published magazines ALSO published books related to the magazine topic. Very often, the books published were collections of articles from the magazine or were written by their top article writers or editors. Nothing unusual there. As I was researching the copyright status of many of these niche magazines, I became curious about the books that were advertised as well…and that’s when I noticed a trend…

Pay attention to this…

I noticed that every magazine I checked that had NOT renewed their magazine copyright ALSO had never renewed the copyright for any of the books they published! I’m sure there are exceptions to this rule, but I have checked books from nearly a dozen different magazines, and if the magazine itself is in the Public Domain, so are the books they published. This is huge because most of the time, the books that were published by these magazine publishers offered the BEST information they had published. They wanted to sell books, so they “put out the good china” for all who purchased the books. This secret discovery has changed my Public Domain research strategy quite a bit because I started buying a number of those books from the magazines, and guess what…the content is awesome! Two just came in the mail yesterday. So far, every book that I’ve found in a Public Domain magazine that was published by the magazine publisher has provided some of the best Public Domain content I’ve found to date (so far I’ve picked up a couple dozen books in nearly a dozen different niches using this method).

Now, if you want to just hop online, go to some website and download Public Domain content that already been scanned, edited and waiting for you…then this strategy isn’t for you. This method requires some work. You have to:

  • Find and purchase the magazines
  • Check the copyright status of the magazines (and magazine articles)
  • Go through the magazine to search for ads that offer books from the publisher
  • Check the copyright status of the books
  • Find and purchase the books
  • Scan and OCR the books

You may not want to go through all that effort for your content…and that’s okay with me. Just know that my content is likely going to be superior to yours, which means better products and better sales. However, if you are serious about finding quality, proven content for your next niche project, I just handed you the keys to the research kingdom!

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